Hydrotherapy

/Hydrotherapy
Hydrotherapy 2018-03-02T10:09:18+00:00

Frequently Asked Questions

What is hydrotherapy and how will it benefit my dog?
Hydrotherapy is a form of physiotherapy carried out in water. For most conditions where hydrotherapy has been recommended to you, either through a friend or your vet, the main reason a dog will be having difficulty is due to muscle wastage somewhere. The properties of water offer an environment in which your dog can exercise muscles, joints, ligaments and tendons without feeling any of the shocks they would when walking on land. The resistance created by moving through the water works the muscles much harder, whilst the buoyancy creates a greater range of movement in the limb, both help to increase that lost muscle tone which will help to support affected joints and make your dog much stronger.

How long is each session?
Our Initial Assessment lasts approx 1 hour. We will discuss your dog’s condition with you, how long you have been noticing the issues, anything they are struggling to do at home, your current exercise regime and what your goals are. We will take some measurements, which along with your observations at home will be used to assess progress. We can give you advice about products on the market that we feel may be beneficial. We will look very closely at the way your pet is moving and establish the best way for you to be exercising them. The session will end with a very gentle introduction to the water. We will then build on this during future sessions. It is important for you to monitor how your pet is at home following each session and report back to us.

Each follow up session will be 30 minutes long.

What will my dog do in the water?
All treatment is carried out in the under water treadmill. This means your pet will be walking through the water rather than swimming. This is a functional movement so ensures your pet is building the muscles they need to carry out their day-to-day tasks. We are able to control the speed the patient is moving at so can ensure we are really targeting the areas that need strengthening. The first session is normally a bit scary for them especially is they’re not keen on water. Don’t be too concerned if they look a little worried, they soon get the hang of it. It is important to give them lots of reassurance. We take our time and try to keep them as calm as possible. Most of them grow to love it!

What do I need to do to be able to bring my dog to you for hydrotherapy?
All patients are treated under a veterinary referral. We will need your name and address, the patients name and which veterinary practice you use to be able to obtain this from them. All you need to do is provide us with this information and arrange a suitable appointment time with us. Once you have your appointment booked make sure your dog doesn’t eat 2 hours before and after their appointment.

Will my insurance policy cover me for hydrotherapy treatment?
Yes, they should. We are full members of The Canine Hydrotherapy Association. This is the only stipulation most companies make. It is best to give them a call before attending sessions to confirm their policy, as they are all slightly different. We are happy to complete forms for you as and when you require.

How much does the treatment cost?
Initial Consultation = £45
Follow up sessions = £36

How often will I need to bring my pet?
After initial assessment it is easier to answer this question, every patient varies, therefore the frequency of their hydrotherapy sessions will vary depending on problem and condition of the patient. Most cases will need to come once to twice a week initially and this is reviewed after 5 sessions to once a week or fortnightly patient dependant. Patients will ideally need to come for a minimum of 10 sessions and reviewed again, patients may then get signed off of treatment or they may need further ongoing maintenance depending on condition and comfort levels.

Do I stay for the duration of the session?
This is dependant on personal preference; most patients find it more motivational having their owners in attendance. However there are a few which may benefit more from not having their owners there, you know your pet the best and the decision is down to you. At a minimum we will need to discuss how the patient has been since their last session and ongoing treatment.

Do I need to bring anything with me?
A towel or blanket for the car journey home is advisable, whilst we endeavour to get patients as dry as possible they may still leave a bit damp. Bringing favourite toys and treats may help to better motivate patients.

Other key information.
Please make sure your pet has gone to the toilet prior to their session. There is a charge for defecating in the water due to the down time required to clean the system before it can be used again.

If you arrive early for your session please wait in reception or in your car until you are called in. We can only treat one patient at a time and need to give them 100% of our care and attention. Your cooperation in this is gratefully appreciated.

At the VHC we are lucky to be able to offer acupuncture as an additional pain relief treatment. This is performed by our veterinary surgeon Fiona. If this is something you may be interested in please do not hesitate to enquire and your information will be passed on to Fiona.

Currently we are open:

Tuesday: 9.00- 5.00
Thursday: 10.00- 5.30

And some Saturdays- if you would like a Saturday appointment please let us know and we can see when is suitable for you.

Cases suitable for treadmill.

  • Post hip replacement (2weeks post op)
  • Post cruciate surgery (3-4 weeks post op)
  • Post patella surgery (3-4 weeks post op)
  • Spinal surgery (depending on paralysis, recumbency, start date up to referring vet)
  • Spinal injury (depending on paralysis, recumbency, start date up to referring vet)
  • Post fibrocartilaginous embolism (depending on paralysis, recumbency, start date up to referring vet, pool may be better suited initially)
  • Post op elbow surgery (once wound healed, pool initially)
  • Shoulder conditions/ instability
  • Muscle sprains and strains
  • Weakness in hind limbs (not severe osteoarthritis)
  • Hip/ elbow dysplasia
  • Early stages of chronic degenerative myelopathy (CDRM)
  • Obesity

Not suitable for treadmill.

  • Severe osteoarthritis
  • End stage CDRM, better suited to pool
  • Morbid obesity, better suited to pool
  • Recumbence
  • Neurological conditions where high tone is increased by standing or active movements in the treadmill.

Cases suitable for treadmill.

  • Post hip replacement (2weeks post op)
  • Post cruciate surgery (3-4 weeks post op)
  • Post patella surgery (3-4 weeks post op)
  • Spinal surgery (depending on paralysis, recumbency, start date up to referring vet)
  • Spinal injury (depending on paralysis, recumbency, start date up to referring vet)
  • Post fibrocartilaginous embolism (depending on paralysis, recumbency, start date up to referring vet, pool may be better suited initially)
  • Post op elbow surgery (once wound healed, pool initially)
  • Shoulder conditions/ instability
  • Muscle sprains and strains
  • Weakness in hind limbs (not severe osteoarthritis)
  • Hip/ elbow dysplasia
  • Early stages of chronic degenerative myelopathy (CDRM)
  • Obesity

Not suitable for treadmill.

  • Severe osteoarthritis
  • End stage CDRM, better suited to pool
  • Morbid obesity, better suited to pool
  • Recumbence
  • Neurological conditions where high tone is increased by standing or active movements in the treadmill.